Pedicure y leccion en Espanol

spanishThis morning I got a pedicure with Melina. I also got a short Spanish lesson. In Florida my pedicurist was a Vietnamese man so there wasn’t much talking. Melina did not initiate conversation but I kept asking questions and she corrected me. Mis palabras parra oy: desagradable, cortar, pedicure and cera caliente. Rude, cut, pedicure (easy) and hot wax. I should learn the words for “my spelling is atrocious” but I figure I will seldom have to write Spanish as long as I learn to speak and read. When I told her that in Estados Unidos un hombre did pedicures, she thought it was funny. Melina was very patient with my mangled Spanish and I will be back in two weeks for another attempt.

To finish off getting the supplies needed to decorate the bedroom, we went to the Alto Dorado hardware store where I continued to massacre the Spanish language. I needed plywood cortar (notice the multi-use of cortar in a single day) so I gave the man at the counter the measurements in cm and pulgadas (inches). At the end of the day, my 3 pieces of plywood were cut perfectly.

Feeling pretty proud of myself. If I continue learning just five new words each day, I should be somewhat fluent before I am muerta (dead).

living in Panama

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5 thoughts on “Pedicure y leccion en Espanol

  1. Reading words seems to be the easiest for me, but then when I have to search my brain to actually find those words…that’s when the trouble starts! Keep learning and posting 🙂 What color are your toes by the way =)

    • In preparation for the big move, I received an email each day from spanishdict.com (it’s free). A word, phrase or verb is highlighted and then used in two ways with the English translation. I have begun to do the Color Purple thing by sticking notes in Spanish on items all over the house. If a canned or boxed grocery item is in English/Spanish, I cut the label off and add it to my language journal. Es muy facil!

      • That’s good because that’s the words you will use. A lot of Spanish lessons in the US are for business people (meetings, appointments, etc) or use high school books (She is intelligent) when you need to know “I would like a pound of turkey breast” or “Where can I find tomato juice.” Learning words for a hardware store has also been very useful. When are you moving?

  2. I love it how the people in the Alto Dorado hardware speak Spanish with a Chinese accent. (For those who don’t know: in Panama nearly all the hardware stores are owned by Chinese, to the point where the stores are called “Chinos”.)

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